Zines/Books coming soon!

Hello people, we just ordered another batch of zines and books from Microcosm Publishing for the distro! LIMITED COPIES ONLY! WE ARE TAKING PRE-ORDERS NOW, DO CONTACT US!

Cometbus #49 by Aaron Cometbus [RM15, 100 pages]
Aaron’s description of his travels, life, houses, and culture. Very instrumental and influential in shaping zine making today. #49 is a contributor issue. Aaron has an amazing ability to explain and glamorize things in punk that most of forget or begin to take for granted. He makes sex in a dumpster sound like something to seek out. He makes me want to kiss in the rain. He makes a horrible tour sound like a great experience. He turns broken bones and horrible injuries into a great metaphor for appreciating life. [taken from Microcosm Publishing website]

Green Zine #14 by Cristy Road [RM15, 64 pages]
Cristy Road has always brought us breathtaking artwork (some of my favorite) along with literary stories that remind us of the strength and ability of punk youth. This new issue is more of the same with some reflection of Cristy’s various homes between Miami and Philadelphia, racism in her communities, the strength of her friends, coming to terms with assault, gender, sexuality, and identity, and much more. The words are powerful, the stories make you feel like anything can be accomplished, and the artwork adds another strong element. Once a true fanzine devoted to Green Day, this zine has now evolved into literary prose devoted to the strengths of our communities.

Make A Zine!: When Words and Graphics Collide by Joe Biel [RM25, 160 pages]
In Microcosm’s DIY guide to zine-making, editors Bill Brent, Joe Biel, and a cast of contributors take you from the dreaming and scheming stages onto printing, publication and beyond! Covering all the bases for beginners,
Make a Zine! hits on more advanced topics like Creative Commons licenses, legality, and sustainability. Says Feminist Review, “Make a Zine! is an inspiring, easy, and digestible read for anyone, whether you’re already immersed in a cut-and-paste world, a graphic designer with a penchant for radical thought, or a newbie trying to find the best way to make yourself and your ideas known.” Illustrated by an army of notable and soon-to-be-notable artists and cartoonists, Make a Zine! also takes a look at the burgeoning indie comix scene, with a solid and comprehensive chapter by punk illustrator Fly (Slug and Lettuce, Peops.) Part history lesson, part how-to guide, Make a Zine! is a call to arms, an ecstatic, positive rally cry in the face of TV show book clubs and bestsellers by celebrity chefs. As says Biel in the book’s intro, “Let’s go!”

Doris Anthology: 1991-2001 by Cindy Crabb [RM40, 320 pages] RESTOCK!
Cindy writes her zine, DORIS, like she is figuring out the human condition. She makes writing about the simplest and most common things – playing music, childhood, cooking, or sex- resonate with universal understanding. She helps us make sense of more complex things like the satisfaction from doing useful work, natural curiosity, the ability to use logic, gender dynamics, introspection, the need for challenge and change, combating depression, and creating art and literature. She shares and explores the emotions that go along with having an abortion, rape, dealing with the death of family, or sexual harrassment in a context that is enlightening and personal, feeling like a close friend opening up to you. What’s most impressive though is that she relates these things into every article in her zine seamlessly. [taken from Microcosm Publishing website]

Doris #15: The Anti-Depression Guide by Cindy Crabb [RM12, 32 pages] RESTOCK!
Doris #15 starts by stating “there is nothing wrong with a little depression.  It is a reasonable response to this fucked up world and you don’t need to hide or deny it.”  That’s what makes this anti-depression guide so great.  It doesn’t treat depression like a disease that needs to be hidden and suppressed with the latest trend in drug therapy.  Instead, it offers fun, real-life advice from someone who had dealt with depression. [taken from Microcosm Publishing website]

Indestructible by Cristy Road [RM20, 96 pages] RESTOCK!
The follow up to Green Zine #14; Cristy Road now offers up a novel about her years in grade school and high school in Miami – valiantly trying to figure out and defend her gender identity, cultural roots, punk rock nature, and mortality. You know that the artwork alone in here makes this a page turner and the whole package more exciting. Cristy has always existed to remind us of the strength and ability of punk youth – for addressing things like rape, homophobia, and misogyny. This is no exception; giving voice to every frustrated 15 year old girl under fire from her peers for being queer or butch or punk. [taken from Microcosm Publishing website]

Bipedal, By Pedal! [RM12, 40 pages] RESTOCK!
Expozine Best English Zine Award Winner 2008! A social history and tactics lesson about the Critical Mass bicycle movement. Initially meant to serve as a lesson for the unaware, this document is a refresher and motivator about the movement. The biggest question – “is Critical Mass a protest or a celebration?” is explored in extensive detail here and in submission pieces by Ted White (early Critical Mass co-founder and director of “We aren’t blocking Traffic!” documentary), Ayleen Crotty (co-host of the KBOO bike show), Scott Larkin (Go By Bicycle zine) , and more. There are also extensive reprints from the 1995 Critical Mass zine “Hey! Get Out of Our Way!” that updates the text and ideas. Illustrations (on every page!) by Matt Gauck, Fly, Sparky Taylor, Andy Singer, a clipping from “The Oregonian”, and more! [taken from Microcosm Publishing website]

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